Page 6

junjul14

news & trends Fuel cells, like this polymer exchange membrane cell, may gain ground in the U.S. with the help of $3 million in funding from the DOE. and raised domestic manufacturing by more than 60 percent. Late last year, as part of the Obama administration’s “all-of-the-above energy strategy,” the DOE announced some $7 million for fuel cell projects. According to the DOE’s 2013 “Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office” report, its R&D efforts have “helped manufacture about 40 new commercial technologies in the U.S., support 65 new technologies that are expected to reach commercial-scale within the next three to five years, and issue more than 450 U.S. patents.” n America uses more energy in 2013, struggles to reduce carbon emissions Although Americans get 84 percent of total energy from oil, coal, and natural gas, a new report finds that, overall, Americans used more energy in all forms—renewable, fossil, and nuclear—in 2013. According to new data from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Americans used 2.3 quadrillion thermal units (quads) more in 2013 than they did in 2012. Wind energy showed a strong 18-percent growth, and natural-gas prices Survey shows researchers are not tapping in to social media A new paper by a Michigan State University researcher suggests that university scholars have all but ignored social networks in distributing scientific findings and connecting with their tweet-happy, tech-savvy students. What is a widely used channel for distributing content and making connections online in the business world just has not taken hold in academia. According to Christine Greenhow, assistant professor at MSU’s College of Education, this is a concern because of a growing push to increase access to publicly funded research. “Only a minority of university researchers are using free and widely available social media to get their results and published insights out and into the hands of the public, even though the mission of public universities is to create knowledge that makes a difference in people’s lives,” Greenhow says in an MSUToday report. “Simply put, there’s not much tweeting from the ivory tower.” According to Greenhow, faculty are just beginning to dip toes in the social media waters to share research findings. She further suggests that higher education will not see widespread adoption unless “universities adopt policies for promotion and tenure that reward these practices.” Her survey of 1,600 researchers found that only 15 percent use Twitter, 28 percent use YouTube, and 39 percent use Facebook to connect with collaborators and distribute their work—not to engage or educate their students. “Academia is not serving as a model of social media use or preparing future faculty to do this,” says Greenhow, who believes the issue “is at the heart of largest discussions regarding accessibility, equal rights to education, transparency, and accountability.” The paper, appearing online in the British Journal of Educational Technology, is “Social scholarship: Reconsidering scholarly practices in the age of social media” (DOI: 10.1111/bjet.12150). n increased slightly in 2013. This resulted in a shift from the recent reliance on more costly coal to cheaper-to-produce natural gas. However, the move contributed to increased CO2 emissions (a first since 2010). Nuclear energy use also was up, despite the fact that a few reactors, including the San Onofre Nuclear Credit: HowStuffWorks; YouTube Status of U.S. nuclear power plants as of September 2013. 4 www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 93, No. 5 Credit: U.S. Energy Information Administration Findings suggest that academia has not yet embraced social media. Credit: J. Howie; Flickr CC BY 2.0


junjul14
To see the actual publication please follow the link above