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acers spotlight Tribute to Warren W. Wolf, 1941–2014 The Society learned with sorrow that former president Warren W. Wolf died April 25. Wolf served as ACerS president from April 2005 to October 2006—the Wolf longest term in modern times—as a result of the transition of the Annual Meeting from April to October to align with MS&T. His succession through the three presidential offices (president elect nominee, president-elect, and president) coincided with a financially precarious time at the Society. Leading the Board through several bold steps to address the crisis, Wolf reported in a 2005 Bulletin interview that the Society had retired all of its debt and had a “bottom line … even further in the black than projected.” The newfound fiscal stability allowed Wolf to implement the Society’s 2005–2010 strategic plan, which included taking advantage of emerging opportunities, promoting ACerS’ value to corporations and students, reinvigorating the Bulletin and its Editorial Advisory Board, and starting two new events. Those events remain active today—the International Conference on Ceramic Interconnect & Ceramic Microsystems Technologies, and the first International Congress on Ceramics. The Society made what Wolf called “two major, future-setting decisions” during his tenure: establishment of the Ceramics Publishing Company to serve the art ceramics community; and investment in web-based infrastructure to create and power ceramics.org. Wolf earned his B.S. in ceramic engineering from Pennsylvania State University, Ph.D. from Ohio State University, and MBA from Xavier University. He spent 33 years at Owens Corning, joining the company in 1968 as a senior scientist at the Science and Technology Center in Granville, Ohio. He retired in August 2001 as vice president and chief scientist of science and technology. An innovative scientist, he holds 15 patents in the area of glass fiber manufacturing processes and compositions. Wolf’s research into understanding the human health issues relating to glass fibers in lung tissue led the International Association on Research in Cancer to remove biosoluble glass fibers from its list of possible carcinogens. The glass industry recognized this work and his leadership in glass science with the Phoenix Award at a gala celebration in 2006. David Green, ACerS president, speaking on behalf of all, says, “The Society extends its heartfelt condolences to Warren’s family. Much of the success the Society enjoys today traces back to his leadership, not just as president, but also as a leader in industry. Those of us who had the honor to work with him will miss his insight, vision, and passion for the Society.” Wolf, of New Albany, Ohio, was 72 years old, and is survived by his wife Linda, seven children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren. n Reflection from ACerS’ past presidents From time-to-time events occur that cause one to stop, look back, and reflect on the greater meaning of things long since gone by. For many members of the Society and the broader ceramics and glass community, the unexpected passing of Dr. Warren W. Wolf is such an occasion. Much can be said of Warren’s accomplishments as an industrial glass researcher and his contributions to the glass industry. As past presidents of The American Ceramic Society, we wish to acknowledge his outstanding leadership of the Society during a time of great challenge, which included his extended tenure as president in 2005–2006. This period of change included the laudatory goals of providing greater financial stability for the Society; meeting the rapidly changing needs of industry; serving the ceramic art community; and perhaps, most important of all, reaching out nationally and internationally to better serve the Society’s entire membership. Those involved with the Society at the time were keenly aware of Warren’s great sense of business and finance, his clear thinking on complicated issues, and his ability to envisage what could—indeed, must—be done for the good of the Society. Ever the optimist and totally committed to meeting the Society’s challenges, he recognized the changing nature of the world in which we live and the obligation to serve it well, whether as an industrial scientist or engineer, educator, artist, government servant, or dedicated humanist, which he was. It is sometimes remarked that no one knows where the influence of a great teacher really ends. The same cloth can be laid on Warren’s shoulders as the Society traverses this new century. We bid him a fond farewell. – John Wachtman, Dale Niesz, William Rhodes, William Payne, Robert Eagan, Dennis Readey, David Johnson, Delbert Day, Carol Jantzen, James McCauley, Stephen Freiman, Paul Becher, Robert Oxnard, James Houseman, Gary Messing, Kathryn Logan, John Marra, Katherine Faber, L. David Pye, John Kaniuk, Edwin Fuller, Marina Pascucci, George Wicks, and Richard Brow To view an extended tribute to Wolf, visit www.ceramics.org/in-memoriam. 8 www.ceramics.org | American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 93, No. 5


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