Meet ACerS president, Richard Brow

janfeb13

Meet ACerS president, Richard Brow By Eileen De Guire visiting scientists, one of whom was For example, according to Brow, Delbert Day. When Day was prepar- a TIG might develop on the subject ing to retire from the faculty at the of biomaterials. Such a group would “Iengineering was when I about moving to academia, a move resources. Brow says, “I can see thesebe able to engage people within theSociety who might not otherwisefind the organization or know of itsUniversity of Missouri, Rolla (nowMissouri University of Science andTechnology), he suggested Brow thinkhad no idea what ceramic went to Alfred,” admits Richard Brow, Brow made in 1997, where he remains groups becoming fundamental to the ACerS president for 2012–2013. on the MS&T faculty. way we do business and to the way Having grown up in the Finger Lakes Brow’s entrée into The American we project ourselves to the rest of the region of upstate New York, Brow Ceramic Society was typical and world.” knew of the New York State College understated—he gave a presenta- His second goal for the year perhaps of Ceramics at Alfred, N.Y., through tion at a Glass & Optical Materials harkens to his serendipitous discovery a family connection, and he knew he Division meeting. From that auspi- of ceramic engineering—finding ways was headed toward engineering. But, cious beginning, he started organizing for the Society to support ceramic it was not until he took “mud lab” sessions at GOMD meetings, think- engineering education. Brow observes, from James Funk, an Alfred professor, ing, “Wouldn’t it be great to get this “There is good ceramic engineering that he found an intellectual home person and this person and this person being done at places like 3M and and a career. Brow says, “honestly, it from around the world together so I Boeing because the materials exist. was so much fun, I kind of fell into it could learn from them?” Inevitably, The materials don’t change—maybe then.” his ACerS colleagues tapped him for the way we educate engineers to deal Similar chance events steered the leadership stream of GOMD and with the materials changes—but the Brow into a career as a glass scientist. now, the Society. materials are still there.” He asks, Helmut Schaeffer at the University of Brow credits the Society with pro- “How do we identify who is working Erlangen (Germany) introduced him viding him an opportunity to grow on ceramics out there, including in to glass science during a junior year professionally. “By taking on respon- places like Boise or Amherst. How do study abroad. Thanks to an economic sibility, I had a chance to develop we engage, nurture, and support these downturn and a tight job market in collaborators and friends who, in the faculty and students?” After all, he the early 1980s, Brow opted to go to long run, really were important to notes, the industrial base necessarily graduate school and studied under my career,” he says. “I discovered it casts its net for engineering talent to William LaCourse at Alfred for his accidentally, but I think every young work on ceramic materials wider than master’s degree. For his PhD, Brow person that gets involved with the the pool of ceramic engineers that headed south to Pennsylvania State Society discovers it ‘accidentally.’ For graduate from Alfred and Rolla. University, where he was the first me, it was finding people who were Although the presidential year is graduate student of Carlo Pantano. interested in the same things I was very demanding, Brow probably had He credits LaCourse and Schaeffer interested in, so I could learn from an easier time convincing his fam- for igniting a lifelong love of studying them.” ily of the merits of the role. His wife, glass, “They turned me into a glass So deep is Brow’s commitment to Theresa McCarthy-Brow, is a Penn weenie, and I’ve been lucky enough finding people from whom he can State ceramic engineer, too, and man- to stay a glass weenie for the past 30 learn, that a primary goal of his presi- aged a program for the Air Force in years!” dential year is to establish a network New Mexico for making large pieces A summertime stint at Sandia of “technical interest groups,” or of glass for satellite deployment. They National Labs (Albuquerque, N.M.) TIGs. He sees TIGs as a way to make have two daughters, and the entire turned into a full-time position after it easier than ever to get involved in family enjoys following Cardinals graduation, and Brow spent 13 years ACerS. “I would like to create within baseball in their free time. researching glass with other promi- the Society the means for members Brow invites members to contact nent scientists, including Ronald to develop ideas, take advantage of him at brow@mst.edu.n Loehman and Jeffrey Brinker. Brow’s emerging opportunities, or be able to lab also served as home base for cluster around a common interest.” American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 92, No. 1 | www.ceramics.org 3


janfeb13
To see the actual publication please follow the link above