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Plenary session Oct. 28, 2013, at 8 to 10:20 a.m. | Rm 517 Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Extreme Environments Kevin G. Bowcutt, Senior Technical Fellow, Chief Scientist of Hypersonics, The Boeing Company Hypersonic Flight: The Final Frontier of Aeronautics Abstract: Efforts to develop technologies that will enable hypersonic flight have been ongoing since the late 1950s. During this time substantial advancements have been made in high-temperature structural Bowcutt materials and thermal protection systems, hypersonic propulsion systems, such as scramjets, and advanced vehicle design methods and tools. Taken together, these advancing technologies are moving mankind ever closer to achieving practical hypersonic flight. During the past decade, emphasis has been placed on validating in flight the key technologies, design techniques, and design concepts for hypersonic vehicles. For example, in 2004, NASA successfully flight tested the world’s first airframe-integrated scramjet (X-43A), in 2010, the US Air Force successfully flight tested the world’s first flight-weight and fuel-cooled scramjet (X-51A), and other flight experiments are being conducted by the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HIFiRE) program. Maturing technologies to the point where hypersonic platforms are technically viable and hypersonic flight is economically affordable will provide means to enable dramatically faster military mission execution and global transportation as well as dramatically more affordable space transportation. This presentation will address the key technical aspects and challenges of hypersonic vehicle design and will summarize progress made in maturing technologies critical to the successful development of practical hypersonic systems. The successful X-51A and HIFiRE flight test programs will be highlighted. The presentation will conclude by describing a vision for a hypersonic space and global transportation system. John Sarrao, Associate Director for Theory, Simulation, and Computation, Los Alamos National Laboratory The Codesign of Experiment and Theory at the Mesoscale: A MaRIE Perspective Abstract: MaRIE, for Matter–Radiation Interactions in Extremes, is Los Alamos National Laboratory’s facility concept for addressing decadal challenges in Sarrao materials, especially in extreme environments, through a focus on predicting and controlling materials microstructure. MaRIE will be an international user facility and will enable unprecedented in-situ, transient measurements of “real” mesoscale materials in relevant extremes, especially dynamic loading and irradiation extremes. Concurrent advances in multiscale modeling and computational resources hold great promise for rapid progress toward these goals. In this presentation we will discuss the science questions that motivate such a facility and our vision for realizing it. Importantly, theoretical and computational advances that enable effective data utilization are of comparable significance and challenge as the acquisition of said data. Our recent experience in attempting to pursue this vision of prediction and control will form a central element of the presentation. Biography: Sarrao leads the Laboratory’s efforts in applying science-based prediction to existing and emerging national security missions. Previously, Sarrao was the Program Director for Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Office of Science Programs and for MaRIE. He has also served on a number of US DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee subcommittees, helping to set strategic directions for materials research. He obtained his PhD in physics from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1993 based on thesis work performed at LANL. He returned to LANL as a technical staff member following postdoctoral research with Zachary Fisk at the University of California, San Diego and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee, Fla. Sarrao’s primary research interest is in the synthesis and characterization of correlated electron systems, especially actinide materials. He is the coauthor of more than 540 publications and was the 2004 winner of the LANL Fellows Prize for Research. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, and LANL. Tresa M. Pollock, FASM, ALCOA Professor, University of California, Santa Barbara Materials in Turbine Engine Environments Abstract: The extreme combinations of temperature, stress, strain rate, vibratory loading, and oxidizing conditions encountered in turbine engines pose a major challenge for the materials operating in these environments. As a result, the design and performance Pollock of new aircraft engines, power generation plants, and rocket propulsion systems are often limited by the turbine materials. For an individual component, a spectrum of failure modes may occur. The challenges in developing monolithic materials as well as hybrid combinations of materials that satisfy a wide range of property constraints will be discussed. Some examples of successes and failures in the development of new materials for turbine engines will be highlighted. The need for computational and experimental tools that enhance the discovery, design, and deployment of new materials for turbine environments will also be discussed. American Ceramic Society Bulletin, Vol. 92, No. 6 | www.ceramics.org 43


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